Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

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Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

Postby HoodedMan » Wed Dec 28, 2005 11:26 pm

I didn't say it was incorrect. Indeed, I said it was not the most common way; as you said, I've seen it before and while I doubted it was incorrect, it was a possibility. I just figured a new German student might want to know the most common conjugations instead of slightly older ones like you mentioned.
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Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

Postby Angelique » Thu Dec 29, 2005 12:00 am

Understood. But poetic and archaic words are common roadblocks students of the German language need to be on the lookout for, as well as- my biggest weakness- Dialekt and colloquialisms.
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Postby StarChild » Thu Dec 29, 2005 10:27 pm

Thanks, gang. I appreciate all the help. I will have to watch for the conjugating verbs factor, and definitely arrange to get some serious language courses under my belt here. :read
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Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

Postby StarChild » Mon Jan 09, 2006 5:55 pm

:( Can anyone translate a name concoction idea I have for a story into German? The name would be nightdreamer, or the word nightdreams. Do all German words in plural end with an "e"? :scratch
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Postby Angelique » Mon Jan 09, 2006 8:14 pm

Nachtträume, perhaps?
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Postby StarChild » Mon Jan 09, 2006 8:34 pm

Danke schoen, mein freund!! :tail
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Postby Cibo » Mon Jan 09, 2006 10:38 pm

Yupp, and nightdreamer would be Nachtträumer.
No, not all German plurals end with "e", but quite a lot. Unfortunately, unlike English you can't derive the plural from the singular just by simply adding the same letter always. There are rules but I guess this must still be a real pain in the butt to learn. :yech For example the plural of Nachtträumer would be Nachträumer, Nachttraum- Nachtträume, Fuß- Füße (english singular: foot), Haus- Häuser (house), Blume- Blumen (flower), Hund- Hunde (dog), Ticket- Tickets (ticket), Lehrer- Lehrer (teacher), Lehrerin- Lehrerinnen (mistress), Engel- Engel (angel), Held- Helden (hero), Mechanismus- Mechanismen (mechanism) etc. etc.
By the way, this a very good online German- English/English- German dictionary I constantly use (otherwise I'd make even more mistakes:whistle) and highly recommend. It lists about anything and offers many links even to audio files.
Main page:
http://www.leo.org/
English dictionary:
http://dict.leo.org/?lang=en&lp=ende&search=
And now there's life/ And a chance to make up for all those mistakes/ But please don't get me wrong/ Cos everything was honest/ True and from the heart/ There's still the same old hang ups so don't fret/ It's not safe yet/ And who knows there's always time to screw up again
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Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

Postby HoodedMan » Mon Jan 09, 2006 11:23 pm

LEO is brilliant. Also, for looking up conjugation and such, so is Canoo.
ACHTUNG! Alles touristen und non-technischen looken peepers! Das computermachine ist nicht fuer gefingerpoken und mittengrabben. Ist easy schnappen der springenwerk, blowenfusen und poppencorken mit spitzensparken. Ist nicht fuer gewerken bei das dumpkopfen. Das rubbernecken sichtseeren keepen das cotten-pickenen hans in das pockets muss; relaxen und watchen das blinkenlichten.
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Postby Tyros » Tue Jan 10, 2006 8:09 am

Originally posted by Cibo
Lehrer- Lehrer (teacher), Lehrerin- Lehrerinnen (mistress),

By the way, this a very good online German- English/English- German dictionary I constantly use (otherwise I'd make even more mistakes:whistle) and highly recommend. It lists about anything and offers many links even to audio files.
Main page:
http://www.leo.org/
English dictionary:
http://dict.leo.org/?lang=en&lp=ende&search=


Please correct me if I am wrong, but wouldnt female teacher be a better deffinition of Lehrerin- Lehrerinnen then mistress? To me mistress has other conotations....

Also I agree, leo is fantastic! It has helped me out a great deal in the past (and present).
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Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

Postby HoodedMan » Tue Jan 10, 2006 1:11 pm

Well, it's all a matter of translation. Yes, it would be a female teacher but in Europe a female teacher could be called Mistress, without the English connotations that brings.

But yes, female teacher is the most common translation.
ACHTUNG! Alles touristen und non-technischen looken peepers! Das computermachine ist nicht fuer gefingerpoken und mittengrabben. Ist easy schnappen der springenwerk, blowenfusen und poppencorken mit spitzensparken. Ist nicht fuer gewerken bei das dumpkopfen. Das rubbernecken sichtseeren keepen das cotten-pickenen hans in das pockets muss; relaxen und watchen das blinkenlichten.
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Postby Cibo » Tue Jan 10, 2006 6:14 pm

Yes, first I wanted to type female teacher but then I thought there must be a better word to that- and I used Leo and I thought mistress sounded appropriate. Well, I was taught British English in school and it is still stuck in my mind. My shame.:( (I'll guess I'll stick with colour, centre, autumn, flat and such all my live. And I do love the Scottish accent.:D)
And now there's life/ And a chance to make up for all those mistakes/ But please don't get me wrong/ Cos everything was honest/ True and from the heart/ There's still the same old hang ups so don't fret/ It's not safe yet/ And who knows there's always time to screw up again
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Postby Tyros » Tue Jan 10, 2006 8:53 pm

Hey, nothing wrong with british english, I have actually adopted a lot of it since many of my friends here are brits. It was just one of the differences that I thought could be confusing to us crass americans ;)
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Postby Cibo » Tue Sep 05, 2006 11:33 am

In Black Panther 18 Kurt says in his one panel appearence:
Lieberstesh.
What the...? Okay, this word simply doesn't exist.
First I didn't have a clue at all but maybe it's supposed to say "Liebesstich" ("love sting"), another nonexistent word. They could have used the term"Stich ins Herz" (literally: stab/sting into the heart) or "Herzschmerz/ Liebeskummer" (heartsickness/lovesickness) or something like that.
Maybe they just wanted to put in a word that looked somewhat German but deemed still understandable for english readers (is it?). Aaah, sweet cultural diversity!
I whish they'd just drop this random inserting of pseudo- foreign vocabulary. It's ridiculous.:yuck
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Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

Postby EUREKA28 » Sun Mar 18, 2007 2:40 pm

Nightcrawler speaks french in Bizarre adventures vol 2#27.

He says :
- en garde (on guard)
-zut alors (damn)
-café au lait (coffee with milk)
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Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

Postby Angelique » Sun Mar 18, 2007 3:47 pm

Originally posted by EUREKA28
Nightcrawler speaks french in Bizarre adventures vol 2#27.

He says :
- en garde (on guard)
-zut alors (damn)
-café au lait (coffee with milk)


"Zut alors" may be just an affectation. However, speaking of affectations, a lot of upscale coffee shops even in the US have cafe au lait on their menus, rather than "coffee with milk."

And en garde is a basic fencing term that even nonfrancophones use.
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Postby rain360 » Sun Jun 24, 2007 11:47 pm

Originally posted by Cibo
In Black Panther 18 Kurt says in his one panel appearence:
Lieberstesh.
What the...? Okay, this word simply doesn't exist.
First I didn't have a clue at all but maybe it's supposed to say "Liebesstich" ("love sting"), another nonexistent word. They could have used the term"Stich ins Herz" (literally: stab/sting into the heart) or "Herzschmerz/ Liebeskummer" (heartsickness/lovesickness) or something like that.
Maybe they just wanted to put in a word that looked somewhat German but deemed still understandable for english readers (is it?). Aaah, sweet cultural diversity!
I whish they'd just drop this random inserting of pseudo- foreign vocabulary. It's ridiculous.:yuck


You took the words right out of my mouth.
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FYI- I DID NOT MAKE THESE UP. THESE QUOTES ARE NOT MINE.
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Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

Postby BlueVelvet14 » Wed Jun 11, 2008 8:31 pm

My chorus teacher was in the army and did stationary work in Germany. I was trying to help my friend who was taking German this year and he overheard. He gave me some wierd translations:

ich libe dich(i love you)
(take note, the following are pronunciations)
my translation: ik libe dik
his translation: ish libe dish

WAS!! (yay! i spelt it rite!) Then he said something about High and Low German. I repeat, WAS!!
Does Nightie speak High of Low German? What's the difference?
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Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

Postby Angelique » Thu Jun 12, 2008 3:19 am

It's not even as simple as High or Low German. Hochdeutsch (High German) is what I learned in school, what I read in poetry, and not quite what I spoke with my grandparents. From what I gather, it's more or less the German equivalent of the Queen's English. However, there are different dialects for every German speaking area of the world. Nightcrawler would have spoken mostly the Dialekt peculiar to Bavaria.

What I wonder, however, is why, when he code switches, it's always to German rather than Romany. :shrug
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Postby BlueVelvet14 » Sun Jun 22, 2008 10:07 pm

Thank you for cleariing that up, Angelique. When he told me that, I thought:

A: He was cracked :cracked
B: WTF man?

Dankeshoen!

~Velvet

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[Edited on 6/22/08 by BlueVelvet14]
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Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

Postby TomoesDebakel » Sun Nov 09, 2008 7:45 pm

If u need some help with translations,
I could help. I am German.
So if u have quests about special words or terms ask me

Hope there weren´t too much with the same "idea"
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Postby Dedicatedfollower467 » Wed Aug 19, 2009 7:42 pm

I need help from a German native! Or at least somebody who understands the German connotations really, REALLY well.

I've been trying to find the German words for Dad and Grandpa for a story I'm writing. I'm looking for the familiar terms, like "Daddy" or "Granddad" something that means a close, familial relationship with the person.

I've tried a couple of translation sites.

For "Dad" I end up with der Papa, der Papi and der Vati. Which of these would be the best term? Are they like the difference between Dad, Papa, and Daddy? Are they just preference differences, or is there more beneath it?

For "Grandpa" I get der Großpapa, der Opa, and der Opapa. Which of these would be the best term? Again, is it simply a preference difference?

Also, for this story, it's mostly in English, with a father/grandfather who is referred to by the German words by his children and grandchildren, rather than English words. So when they're talking to him, is it okay to drop 'der?' When they're using the word as an name, can I drop the article?
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Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

Postby Angelique » Wed Aug 19, 2009 8:28 pm

Just like in English, when German dads come home, their kids don't say, "Hello, The Daddy!"

Papa and Papi would be most common for "Dad" or "Daddy."
I would guess that Opa is most common for "Grandpa," but that's what my kids call my father and what I called my grandfather.
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Postby Dedicatedfollower467 » Thu Aug 20, 2009 12:42 am

Thanks, very much Angelique! Now I can post my story!

*trundles over to FF&TTT to post new, completed story*
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Right across the lane from the demon and just down the wall from Wolverine.


RIP Kurt Wagner. You were the character who brought in me into comics, who introduced me and inspired me. Now your death has sent me away again. Wherever you are in the Marvel Universe, I hope its someplace pleasant.
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Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

Postby Dedicatedfollower467 » Sun Apr 04, 2010 11:45 pm

... okay, so technically this is a double post.

and yes, this will be slightly :offtopic

But in the recent issue of X-Men (522?) with Magneto and hem hem the bullet, Magneto says a short phrase in what appears to be Yiddish (I'm assuming its Yiddish a. because he's Jewish, b. because it sounds like German at first, c. because there are too many tz's and ts's in it to be not Yiddish!)

Anyways, he says, "Du bist tsu dar, tzatzkeleh."

The nearest translation I've found online says it probably means, "You're too thin, little one." Am I right? It's bothering me.
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Right across the lane from the demon and just down the wall from Wolverine.


RIP Kurt Wagner. You were the character who brought in me into comics, who introduced me and inspired me. Now your death has sent me away again. Wherever you are in the Marvel Universe, I hope its someplace pleasant.
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Re: Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

Postby Marijke Rose » Wed Nov 06, 2013 10:58 pm

To the very last thing: "Du bist tsu dar, tzatzkeleh."... Never heard that phrase here in Germany, and would guess that, assuming it's spelled correctly, no German would have a clue what it means. It could be Yiddish - makes sense. Could also be a dialect. Best I can come up with, is speaking it aloud and seeing if it matches any type of German phrase I can think of. It SOUNDS like "Du bist zu da"... which makes no sense ("You're too there"? Uh, no, not even in German). If that's a phrase, then it's gotta be a very old one. "You are too dear" seems to be a better context, but without having the issue or at least the context, I don't know. Have to guess it's either Yiddish or some Dialect.

Much of Nightcrawler's german, in the comics, seems to either be wrong, misspelled, or old phrases. Likely comes from the fact that Nightcrawler's made by Americans. His German in the movie, was, uh... wierd. Hard to understand (Magneto spoke better German in "First Class", actually - no, seriously, that was awesome, perfect, accent-free German during the Bar Scene when Eric was on his path of revenge; in fact, he spoke better German than the Nazi who called him in to move a coin with his powers {well, the Nazi spoke very good German, but with an odd accent that I can't quite put my finger on} - and, yes, Bitburger IS a damn good beer), very old phrases. I can't recall the older animated series, unfortunately (haven't seen it in years, so can't recall anything about Nightcrawler and his German). In Evolution, his few uses of German were good... Simple, basic phrases, but no blaring mistakes (even the prounications where great, only a little "too carefully" pronounced). And then in Evolution, Rogue, after absorbing Nightcrawler, lets loose with this phrase: "Ig-gerstehe Deutsche? - I can speak German?!" (or, they tried for: "Ich verstehe Deutsche", I guess, but the actress had no clue how to pronounce that - and that's totally wrong)... Just wrong. The proper phase is: "Ich kann Deutsch??", which means "I speak German??" (a person who could suddenly speak German like a native would most likely not phrase it with "I understand German??", which would be "Ich kann Deutsch verstehen??", and definitely not "Ich verstehe Deutsch", which is "I understand German.").

BTW, Hi, I speak German, and may be able to help with German/English translations. I'm fluent in both.
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